90+ Horror Films To Watch On Amazon Prime This Halloween

In 150+ Horror Films To Watch On Amazon Prime This Halloween by john

Netflix gets all the love.  Every year I see lists on what horror films to stream on Netflix, and I myself have such a list on this site.  While most of us carry Netflix with us on our phones, I know lots of folks who take advantage of Amazon Prime’s shipping as well.  This also means they can take advantage of the movies and television shows they offer.  After scouring through their genre selections I have compiled a massive list of horror flicks that should be worth your time.  Check em out!

They Don’t Get Better Than This (10/10)

Night of the Living Dead (1968)

– The one that started it all when it comes to what most perceive as the modern zombie movie, George A. Romero’s 1968 classic is by all means the most iconic zombie film of all time. No holds are barred, as you will see live-action gore, effective social commentary, and a black leading-actor when such things were taboo during the 60s. This is worthy of its recognition and is a must for all horror fans, especially Walking Dead die-hards who want to learn the roots of the zombie sub-genre. Read my full review for this film here: Night of the Living Dead

Almost Perfect (9/10)

Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer: 30th Anniversary Edition (1986/1990)

– Before everyone knew him as “Merle from The Walking Dead”, Michael Rooker gave one of the greatest performances in horror history as Henry Ray Lucas in this amazingly merciless experience. This will leave a hole in your soul. Read my full review for this film here: Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer

Pan’s Labyrinth (2007)

– Guillermo Del Toro’s fantasy masterpiece is also a horrific tale with monsters of both the human and inhuman variety.

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974)

– Tobe Hooper’s debut horror film remains an iconic masterpiece of grindhouse terror over 40 years after its debut.  Few films can claim credit to being a household name and also a near-flawless example of low-budget horror at its best. Read my full review for this film here: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre

Them / Ils (2007)

Them, Ils, French Horror, 2007 Horror

– While as popular as other French horror films like Martyrs and Inside, Them is just as great and equally terrifying.  This simple and expertly executed flick is an atmospheric monument whose terror is unrelenting.  Said to be the film that inspired 2008’s The Strangers, in this experience home sweet home is the last place you’ll want to be.  Read my full review for this film here: Them

You’ll Recommend These To Your Friends (8/10)

10 Cloverfield Lane (2016)

10 Cloverfield Lane, 2016 Horror

– 10 Cloverfield Lane was one of 2016’s biggest surprises.  Nobody knew exactly what it was about, or how it could tie in to the Cloverfield franchise.  We also did not know it would be as good as it is.  Blending elements of character drama, psychological horror, and science fiction, this effort is an engaging piece from start to finish.  It’s tremendous payoff will also leave you begging for a sequel.  Read my full review for this film here: 10 Cloverfield Lane

Afflicted (2014)

Afflicted, 2014 Horror

– This found-footage vampire flick is a true gem for the sub-genre.  It focuses on what is important, like story, characters, horror, and practical effects, and is in my opinion one of the best found-footage films of all time.  Read my full review for this film hereAfflicted

Alice Sweet Alice (1976)

Alice Sweet Alice

– This 70s slasher film follows the mystery behind a series of deaths tied around a 12 year old girl.  Could she be the killer, or is there something more sinister at play?  Alice Sweet Alice is a gem that needs to be seen by more genre fans.  Read my full review for this film here: Alice Sweet Alice

An American Werewolf In London (1981)

– Known mostly for his comedic work, like Animal House, Coming to America, and Three Amigos!, director John Landis struck horror gold with this piece.  The most notable werewolf film that isn’t The Wolf Man, An American Werewolf In London blends a quirky charm with fantastic special effects.  This results in an experience that is both fun and horrific.  Read my full review for this film here: An American Werewolf In London

Asylum (1972)

– This Amicus anthology film centers around a young psychiatrist tasked with interviewing four patients inside a mental asylum for the “incurably insane”.  This results in four creepy stories that make this one of the best horror anthologies out there.  Read my full review for this film here: Asylum

Burn, Witch, Burn (1962)

Burn Witch Burn

– This is one of my favorite 60s horror films as it pits a rational man against powers that cannot be explained, keeping you guessing until the end and resulting in disaster.  Read my full review for this film here: Burn, Witch, Burn

Cloverfield (2008)

– Producer JJ Abrams flipped the found-footage fad on its head by giving us a giant monster terrorizing New York City.  Fans of creature features looking to for a different scope should give this a watch.  Read my full review for this film here: Cloverfield

Deathgasm (2015)

Deathgasm, Top Horror, Netflix

– This New Zealand film is an epic blending of horror and metal. When a young metal band comes across forbidden sheet music from their idol Rikki Daggers, they do what any aspiring music junkies would do – they perform the music…and incidentally unleash Hell on Earth. Gorehounds and metalheads alike are in for a treat with this, as it comes with loads of practical gore effects and numerous nods to metal lore – like having to perform the music backwards to save the world. I highly recommend this piece if you want a hilarious, gory, and downright awesome experience. Read my full review for this film here: Deathgasm

Don’t Torture A Duckling (1972)

Don't Torture A Duckling, Giallo, 1972 Horror, 70s Horror

– Heralded as one of the most controversial giallo films, Don’t Torture A Duckling brings forth strong subject matter and gritty, full-frontal execution from the “Godfather of Gore” Lucio Fulci.  No holds are barred in this tale of a reporter and a local seductress trying to solve a series of child murders in a creepy Italian town.  Read my full review for this film here: Don’t Torture A Duckling

Fire in the Sky (1993)

Fire in the Sky, 1993 Horror, 90s Horror

– This is one of my absolute favorite films. It tells the true story of a group of friends who claim their buddy, Travis Walton, was abducted by aliens on their way home. With the local authorities not buying the story and accusing them of trying to cover up Travis’ murder/disappearance, he mysteriously shows up five days later…and with one hell of a story to tell. If you enjoy alien films then this is a must-watch. It is expertly directed and comes with a highly engaging story that has yet to be disproven. Most importantly though, it includes one of the genre’s most terrifying sequences in the reenactment of Travis’ abduction. Read my full review for this film here: Fire in the Sky

Green Room (2016)

– Two years after the incredible Blue Ruin writer/director Jeremy Saulnier does it again with Green Room – a thrilling ride blending horrific violence and punk rock music.  You don’t see many films like this in the genre, so I highly recommend you take part in this experience. It also stars the late Anton Yelchin. (RIP) Read my full review for this film here: Green Room

Grizzly (1976)

Grizzly is a hell of a killer-animal film thanks to some brutal kills.  While it does not live up to its obvious inspiration, Jaws, it holds its own thanks to its violence and a great performance from Christopher George.  Read my full review for this film here: Grizzly

Hatchet II (2010) – Rated R Version

– This sequel continues the gore-soaked carnage delivered by Victor Crowley, the best killer of this millennium. You don’t necessarily have to see Hatchet before this, however the original is the best in the series. Read my full review for this film here: Hatchet II

House on Haunted Hill (1959)

House on Haunted Hill

This film is available in both the original black and white format as well as in color.  House on Haunted Hill was one of my favorite horror films growing up.  I loved its feel, the nowhere to run scenario, and its spooky skeletons scaring the hell out of our leads.  Horror doesn’t get more wholesome than this.  Read my full review for this film here: House on Haunted Hill

Inferno (1980)

Inferno, 1980 Horror

– Three years after the success of Dario Argento’s Suspiria, the legendary horror director gave us the second part of his “Three Mothers” trilogy, Inferno. Not as successful as Suspiria, this flick has remained one of the most underrated horror films of the 1980s.  Once again, Dario Argento delivers an engaging story alongside incredible direction.  Read my full review for this film here: Inferno

Kabaneri of the Iron Fortress (2016)

Kabaneri of the Iron Fortress

– From the creators of Attack on Titan comes Kabaneri of the Iron Fortress.  This anime blends horror, steampunk, and infected elements into an awesome 12 episode series.  Those of you looking for animated horror need look no further.  Read my full review for this film here: Kabaneri of the Iron Fortress

Pumpkinhead (1989)

Pumpkinhead, 1989 Horror

– This is one of my absolute favorite movies.  Legendary FX maestro Stan Winston directs this masterpiece of creature horror and supreme vengeance.  When a group of teens accidentally kill his young son, Ed Harley (Lance Henriksen) conjures a demon to hunt them down, sparing no cost to his own well-being.  Read my full review for this film here: Pumpkinhead

Stage Fright (1987)

– Directed by Michele Soavi, a protege of Dario Argento, Stage Fright is a fantastic film I highly suggest to fans of slashers and giallo films.  It not only keeps you guessing up till the bitter end, but provides a spooky antagonist (as you can see).  Read my full review for this film here: Stage Fright

The House at the End of Time (2014)

– Venezuelan horror makes an appearance thanks to this film. A supernatural effort that will throw you for a look, this isn’t the simple haunted house film it initially comes off as. By the end of the experience you won’t only be wowed, but you may be in tears as well.  Read my full review for this film here: The House at the End of Time

The Last Man on Earth (1964)

– This adaptation of Richard Matheson’s I Am Legend novel is a fantastic horror classic that gives us a tremendous story alongside great direction/execution. The horror is real thanks to a well-developed character portrayed by Vincent Price, making this one of the best post-apocalyptic films of all time.  Read my full review for this film here: The Last Man on Earth 

The Prowler (1981)

The Prowler is one of the most under-appreciated horror films on this list, and is one of the better horror films to focus on the drama and torment of love. Along with the element of love comes the element of revenge, and then on comes the horror. Most of us have had to deal with a hurt soul before, but not many of us had our love of our life leave us while serving our country overseas. This engaging element only makes the antagonist’s vengeance sweeter to watch. While My Bloody Valentine tackled Valentine’s Day, The Prowler upped the ante by increasing the element of heartbreak, and it makes for an awesome slasher film.  (Heads up: the avatar poster Amazon Prime uses is not a poster for The Prowlers, but just a generic photo)  Read my full review for this film here: The Prowler

The Witch (2016)

– Robert Eggers debut film is a crafty slow-burner unlike any horror film you will see on the big screen these days. It won’t appease those looking for an action-packed onslaught. Instead, it creeps under your skin in brilliant fashion.  Read my full review for this film here: The Witch

Torso (1974)

– Sergio Martino’s Torso is everything that is great about the giallo sub-genre.  Great kills, a memorable antagonist, lots of exploitation, beautiful sets, and intense horror make for one of the best giallo films there is.  Torso is a gem that must be seen.  Read my full review for this film here: Torso

We Are Still Here (2015)

We Are Still Here is a great flick sure to please fans of 80s horror as it is shot in the vien of film’s like Lucio Fulci’s House by the Cemetary. This supernatural effort follows a married couple moving out to the country after the death of their teenage son. Still reeling from the loss, their troubles are far from over as the house they moved in to demands a sacrifice every thirty years, and they arrived just in time. With live-action effects and ghouls that bring back the classic feel genre fans know and love, this is a recommended effort. Read my full review for this film here: We Are Still Here

You Can’t Go Wrong With…(7/10)

Bad Taste (1989)

Bad Taste, 1980s Horror, 80s Horror

– This is the first film from famed New Zealand director Peter Jackson, the man behind The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit trilogies.  Trust me, this film is far from those trilogies.  This gross, gory mess follows a small town that gets wrecked by aliens, turning them into burgers.  Yes, burgers.

Big Ass Spider! (2013)

Big Ass Spider

– When a genetically mutated spider escapes their facility, grows to massive proportions, and wreaks havoc on Los Angeles, the US military must leave the fate of humanity in the hands of a bafoon exterminator ready for his 15 minutes of fame. This effort from Mike Mendez (The Gravedancers) is loads of fun, with Greg Grunberg excelling in his leading role. Read my full review for this film here: Big Ass Spider!

Birth of the Living Dead (2014)

– A solid documentary on the filming and impact of the 1968 classic that started the zombie craze, Night of the Living Dead.  Starring icon George A. Romero.  Read my full review for this film here: Birth of the Living Dead

Blood Car (2007)

– In a day and age where gas is nearing $40 a gallon, a vegan loser running his car on wheatgrass mistakenly learns it will also run on something more readily available – blood.  This revelation, alongside his running car making him an instant chick magnet, leads to unfathomable events to keep his car running at all costs.  I did not think I would enjoy this effort as much as I did.  It’s loaded with blood, and I really enjoy seeing this dude dump bodies into a meat grinding engine.  Give this underappreciated gem a watch.  Read my full review for this film here: Blood Car

Children Shouldn’t Play With Dead Things (1972)

– Before he gained notoriety for Porky’s and A Christmas Story, director Bob Clark hit the horror scene with this PG film that delivers an enjoyable experience with loads of cheese.  It follows a theater ensemble that digs up a corpse to use for playful Satanic ritual, only to find themselves dumbfounded and running for their lives when the spell actually works.  Read my full review for this film here: Children Shouldn’t Play With Dead Things

Cropsey (2009)

– A documentary about a grisly massacre that took place in what has been unofficially deemed “Cropsey’s Woods”. As children Zach and Barbara were told tales of a killer named Cropsey who lurked the neighboring woods where the murders took place. The duo now returns to the community to document whether the man charged with the crimes is the Cropsey that gave them nightmares as children. Read my full review for this film here: Cropsey

Cub (2015)

Cub, Belgian Horror, Belgium Horror

Cub is a Belgian horror film I really enjoyed.  It follows a group of scouts camping in a neck of the woods said to be inhabited by a werewolf, who the locals have blamed for mysterious disappearances.  Forward-thinking scout Sam is the only one who believes the rumors, and stumbles upon a deadly secret nobody will believe…until it is too late.  Read my full review for this film here: Cub

Curtains (1983)

– This slasher gained a cult following thanks to the look of its antagonist, who dons a creepy mask of an old woman.  Set in an isolated mansion, six actresses auditioning for a famed role find themselves the targets of this killer.  I enjoy this film for the killer and the shocking climax, but be aware that the version Amazon Prime is showing doesn’t have the best visual quality.  Read my full review for this film here: Curtains

Dolly Dearest (1991)

– I don’t know why Dolly Dearest doesn’t get anywhere near the love that Child’s Play gets.  I guess it’s because of Brad Dourif’s incredible voicing of Chucky.  Nonetheless, this is one of the best inanimate horror films and a must watch for those creeped out by killer dolls.  Read my full review for this film here: Dolly Dearest

Frankenstein’s Army (2013)

– I regret taking as long as I did to become a part of this spectacular experience. Set during the final stages of World War II, Russian soldiers meet their match when the struggling German army they expected to find has been replaced with an undead army of fallen Nazis pieced together by a descendent of Dr. Frankenstein. This flick, soaked in gore, is adorned with steam punk-influenced antagonists that make for a thrill I love to revisit. Read my full review for this film here: Frankenstein’s Army

God Told Me To (1976)

God Told Me To

– Larry Cohen (It’s Alive, Q: The Winged Serpent, The Stuff) writes and directs this film about a NYC detective investigating a series of murders where the unrelated killers claim God told them to do it.  Forced to take extreme measures in this investigation, he learns a deeply buried secret from his past – a secret necessary to solve these crimes.  Fans of religious horror should should give this a watch.  Read my full review for this film here: God Told Me To

Hatchet III (2013) – Rated R Version

– After directing the first two installments, Adam Green graciously allowed his longtime cinematographer to direct the final chapter of the Victor Crowley vengeance saga. While it doesn’t live up to its incredible predecessors it still builds on the elements fans of the series know and love: live-action gore, Victor Crowley, and more live-action gore. Read my full review for this film here: Hatchet III

Hell House LLC (2016)

Hell House LLC, Found Footage

– This is one of the better found-footage films of recent day.  It centers on a documentary crew investigating a haunted house attraction that went horribly wrong on opening night five years prior.  They make startling revelations that not only dispel the lies told by authorities, but put themselves in the crosshairs of otherworldly forces.  If you are creeped out by mannequins you need to see this.  Read my full review for this film here: Hell House LLC

Killer Legends (2014)

Killer Legends is the newest film from the guy who delivered urban legend documentary, Cropsey. This time he focuses on four popular urban legends instead of just one. The flick is pieced together well and my only gripe would be that I wish the legends would have had more supplemental information. Nonetheless, this is a positive effort for those who enjoy horror documentaries.  Read my full review for this film here: Killer Legends

Monster in the Closet (1987)

Monster in the Closet, Troma

– This is one of my favorite Troma films.  Monster in the Closet is as cheesy as it gets, and follows a low-level reporter joining forces with a team of professors to figure out what is killing people who enter their closets.  Look no further than a heinous monster portrayed by Kevin Peter Hall, known for his roles as Predator.  Read my full review for this film here: Monster in the Closet

My Bloody Valentine (2009)

– This remake of the 1981 classic is a surprisingly good effort that delivers the gore, fun, and thrills fans would expect.  If you enjoy holiday themed horror then you have to see this Valentine’s themed flick, where human hearts are sent as gifts.  On top of this, it stars Supernatural’s Jensen Ackles and 80s horror legend Tom Atkins (The Fog, Night of the Creeps, Maniac Cop).  Read my full review for this film here: My Bloody Valentine 

New Year’s Evil (1980)

– This is such an underrated slasher flick.  New Year’s Evil follows a punk rock TV icon hosting a New Year’s Eve celebration.  She receives a phone call from a deranged man saying that a murder will be committed in every time zone that night, with her being the last.  Heavy in thrills and complimented with a creepy killer, this is a must for slasher fans looking for a hidden gem.  Read my full review for this film here: New Year’s Evil

Open Grave (2014)

– Sharlto Copley (District 9) stars as a man who wakes up in a mass grave deep in the remote wilderness.  He has no clue of where he is, how he got there, and most shockingly…who he is.  Keeping us just as lost as he is, this is an engaging film where viewers find themselves enveloped into the experience.  Read my full review for this film here: Open Grave

Sleep Tight (2013)

– This Spanish film from REC co-director Jaume Balaguero is an atmospheric slow burner.  It follows an apartment concierge who’s only joy in life is making others miserable.  When he sets his sights on a new tenant, his despicable desires grow into full-fledged obsession.  Now set on bringing her biggest fears to life, he becomes a literal boogeyman.  Read my full review for this film here: Sleep Tight

Society (1992)

– There aren’t enough words to describe this debut directorial film for Re-Animator and From Beyond producer Bryan Yuzna.  It’s about the crazy, effed up things the rich elite do behind the scenes.  You know what you want to.  Read my full review for this film here: Society

Summer of Blood (2014)

– Hipsters, this one is for you.  Erik is your stereotypical hipster.  He also sucks in bed and makes the biggest mistake of his life in turning down his girlfriend’s marriage proposal.  Every element of his life is getting worse and worse until he gets the chance of a lifetime – he gets bitten by a vampire.  Now a sexual stud, he is achieving everything he never had…but at a blood-soaked cost.  Read my full review for this film here: Summer of Blood

Terrorvision (1986)

Terrorvision, 80s Horror

– This is one of my favorite creature features.  It follows a family who installs the newest in home TV satellite technology, which inadvertently picks up a signal from a distant planet getting rid of a heinous creature with an insatiable appetite.  The cheese reins high in this one.  Read my full review for this film here: Terrorvision

The Bay (2012)

– Barry Levinson, a non-horror director known for Rain Man and Good Morning, Vietnam, directs this found-footage film that includes an antagonist never before seen in the genre. As convoluted as the found-footage sub-genre is I always appreciate something new. Read my full review for this film here: The Bay

The Cat o’ Nine Tails (1971)

– Dario Argento’s second film is often overlooked due to greatness of the efforts surrounding it (The Bird with the Crystal Plumage & Deep Red), but this is still a worthy watch from the Italian maestro.  It gives us a great mystery element surrounding a blind journalist’s investigation into a pharmaceutical company associated with top-secret experiments and mysterious deaths.  Read my full review for this film here: The Cat o’ Nine Tails

The Children (1980)

– This PG horror film follows a group of children affected by toxic material while passing by a radioactive plant.  The result?  Diabolical beats with the ability to touch adults and turn them into heaping piles of flesh and bone.  If you need an 80s horror fix you should head this direction.  Read my full review for this film here: The Children

The Dead Hate the Living! (2000)

– This low budget flick is a gory shoutout to the films zombie/undead fans grew up loving.  The filmmakers give references to The Evil Dead as well as Lucio Fulci, and give us a cool story too.  A group of filmmakers break into an abandoned hopsital to film a movie, and make the grave mistake of using a dead body in their film.  This opens a portal to another dimension, giving them more bodies than they could have hoped for.  Read my full review for this film here: The Dead Hate the Living

The Girl With All the Gifts (2017)

The Girl with All the Gifts, Zombies, 2017 Horror

The Girl With All the Gifts is a solid zombie film that offers something new to the convoluted sub-genre.  It has parallels to the popular video game The Last of Us, and offers six-time Academy Award nominee in a prominent role.  This is a worthy watch for zombie fans.  Read my full review for this film here: The Girl With All the Gifts

The House On Sorority Row (1983)

The House On Sorority Row, 80s Horror

– This is a great slasher flick where the director graciously heeded its distributor’s demands for more gore.  Couple that with good execution and a sorority house massacre and you have the template necessary for your slasher fix.  Read my full review for this film here: The House On Sorority Row

The Innkeepers (2012)

– My favorite of Ti West’s films, this supernatural tale is one of the best horror flicks of 2011. It takes place during the final days of an old inn, where two employees seeking to expose the inn’s haunted past are visiting by old guests checking in for a final stay. Read my full review for this film here: The Innkeepers

The Last Lovecraft: Relic of Cthulhu (2009)

The Last Lovecraft

– This low-budget indie may have flown under the radar but it is a great shoutout to the work of H.P. Lovecraft.  It is definitely one of the better Lovecraft films of recent day.  Read my full review for this film here: The Last Lovecraft: Relic of Cthulhu

The Legend of Boggy Creek (1972)

The Legend of Boggy Creek, 1972 Horror, 70s Horror

– I love this film so much.  This faux-documentary centers on the sleepy town of Fouke, Arkansas, which is being terrorized by a Bigfoot-esque creature.  Despite its low budget and this being Charles B. Pierce’s debut film, expert direction and tremendous atmosphere make this a horrifying experience.  Read my full review for this film here: The Legend of Boggy Creek

The Returned (2014)

– This is a zombie film that offers a unique perspective – a “Return Protein” that allows the dead to return to society. However, things go awry when supplies of the drug run dry. Read my full review for this film here: The Returned

The Slumber Party Massacre (1982)

– I hold this film close to my heart as it was my first printed review, but also because it kicks ass.  A group of high schoolers having a slumber party fall victim to an uninvited guest slaughtering them with a power drill.  The kills are fun and the thrills are abundant, making this a great 80s slasher film, which is also written and directed by women.  Read my full review for this film here: The Slumber Party Massacre

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2, Chop Top, Bill Mosely

– Tobe Hooper follows up his classic with this enjoyable effort about a radio DJ who gets the attention of the murderous, cannibalistic Sawyer clan…and the vengeful former Texas Ranger (Dennis Hopper) hunting them down.  This was my first time viewing the incredible Bill Moseley, who portrays Chop Top (pictured above).  Read my full review for this film here: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2

The Town That Dreaded Sundown (2014)

– This sequel to the 1974 classic is a joy to watch as it brings back the same look and feel of the original. Taking place 65 years after the original “Moonlight Murders” a new string of grisly deaths are shocking Texarkana. Could it be a copycat killer, or is something more sinister at hand? American Horror Story / Glee director Alfonso Gomez-Rejon does a fantastic job executing the horror here, which include some full-frontal kills that will please slasher fans and gorehounds alike. Read my full review for this film here: The Town That Dreaded Sundown

The Toxic Avenger (1984)

– The one that put Troma on the map. This cheesy gore-soaked experience gives one of my favorite super heroes his silver screen debut. Read my full review for this film here: The Toxic Avenger

The Void (2017)

The Void is a solid horror flick heavy in practical effects and a story that’ll throw you for a loop or two. It’s cult themes and nowhere-to-run scenario make for some engaging thrills.  We don’t get too many genre flicks bringing fresh ideas, so I suggest you give this a watch if you are craving an unpredictable cosmic horror film.  Read my full review for this film here: The Void

The Woman In Black (2012)

– This remake of the 1989 TV movie is a surprisingly good effort.  I was unsure that a Daniel Radcliff-starring remake would be a worthy horror flick, but it succeeded thanks to great atmosphere and spooky sets.  If you want some modern day gothic horror then head this direction.  Read my full review for this film here: The Woman In Black

Trilogy of Terror (1975)

Trilogy of Terror

– This TV movie is one of the more notable anthology films thanks to its infamous third story, “Amelia”.  This installment follows a gifted African Zuni doll that comes to life and harasses a woman…with edged weapons.  Mr. “Ooga Booga” makes this film a mandatory watch for anthology seekers.  Read my full review for this film here: Trilogy of Terror

Venom (1982)

– I love films like this, where criminals become the victims.  It follows a group of international thugs (lead by the incredible Klaus Kinski) that kidnap the child of a wealthy couple, only to be killed off one by one by a phantom black mamba.  It may sound like a silly premise, but Venom delivers.  Read my full review for this film here: Venom

We Are What We Are (2014)

– The American remake to the famed Mexican film of the same name, We Are What We Are is a dramatic cannibal film sold by great performances. It stars three solid actors, Bill Sage, Nick Damici, and Michael Parks, and they do no wrong. It’s a bit of a slow-burner and doesn’t deliver much of the “goods” for a cannibal film, so keep that in mind. Nonetheless, this is a good quality story-driven flick.  Read my full review for this film here: We Are What We Are

Mostly Positive (6/10)

Absentia (2011)

– This dark and moody piece is hailed by many for its unique story. It also happens to be the first feature, non indie film for Mike Flanagan (Gerald’s Game, Hush, Oculus, Ouija: Origin of Evil), who has be KILLING IT ever since.  Be sure and pay close attention if you give it a watch. Read my full review for this film here: Absentia

Citizen Toxie (2002)

– The fourth installment of The Toxic Avenger series makes up for the mediocre second and third installments. Some even say this is the best of the series. Read my full review for this film here: Citizen Toxie

Chopping Mall (1986)

– This was one of my favorite horror films growing up.  The cheese reigns high here, as a fancy mall beefs up their overnight security with a trio of robots programmed to neutralize intruders via non-lethal methods.  A lightning strike fries their systems, and six mall employees having a lock-in at a mattress store learn firsthand how deadly these robots can be.  Read my full review for this film here: Chopping Mall

Creature From Black Lake (1976)

Creature From Black Lake

– While not as good as The Legend of Boggy Creek, this Bigfoot flick still delivers a spooky watch despite its low budget and PG rating.  It follows two Univ. of Chicago students searching a Louisiana swamp for a creature many locals have seen but few will talk about.  Read my full review for this film here: Creature From Black Lake

Dead Dudes in the House (1989)

– This low-budget indie was distributed by Troma, and it shows.  It has great gore, solid effects, and the kills overall are enjoyable.  What makes them even better is they are delivered by an old woman, portrayed in the cheesiest way possible.  Read my full review for this film here:

Don’t Go in the House (1980)

Don't Go in the House

– What I enjoy most about this effort is the killer’s weapon – a flamethrower.  After the death of his strict religious mother, he kills woman who resemble her by hanging them and then engulfing them in flames.  Read my full review for this film here: Don’t Go in the House

Ghoulies (1985)

– This film about a man inheriting a home inhabited by these little demons is far from what you’d expect it to be.  Sure it’s cheesy as hell, but this isn’t a cookie cutter 80s flick.  The story is a zany one.  It also marks the debut film for Law & Order: SVU star Mariska Hartigay.  Read my full review for this film here: Ghoulies

Ghoulies II (1988)

Ghoulies II takes the adorable critters to an amusement park, and I actually prefer this film over the original.  It’s a fun, humorous sequel that I believe is superior on all levels.  Read my full review for this film here: Ghoulies II

Graduation Day (1981)

Graduation Day

– This is a flawed slasher that still delivers a fun experience thanks to following the usual slasher template of fun kills and a decent mystery element.  It also features horror legend Christopher George in a prominent role.  Read my full review for this film here: Graduation Day

Halloween H20: Twenty Years Later (1998)

Halloween H20: Twenty Years Later

– It is not the strongest in the series, but will surely please fans of the franchise who just want to see Michael do his thing.  The reunion between him and Laurie alone makes this worth a watch.  Read my full review for this film here: Halloween H20: Twenty Years Later

Mutant / Forbidden World (1982)

Forbidden World, Mutant

– I love this cheesy creature feature Alien ripoff.  It isn’t without its faults, but it excels at what matters most: the horror.  Read my full review for this film here: Mutant

Nightbeast (1982)

Nightbeast

– This is a B-movie released by Troma about an alien that crash lands in a small Maryland town and develops a thirst for massive amounts of gore.  This has to be the cheesiest film on this list.  Read my full review for this film here: Nightbeast

One Dark Night (1983)

One Dark Night, 80s Horror, 1983 Horror

One Dark Night‘s climax is incredible, with the film’s only downside being it takes 75 minutes for the horror to kick in.  It gained attention for using real human corpses (now illegal) during this scene, and it did so before PoltergeistRead my full review for this film here: One Dark Night

Southbound (2016)

– Alright, so apparently I’m the only one who didn’t love this anthology.  I found it OK, but I have realized it received rave reviews from pretty much everyone else.  So, maybe you’ll really like this.  It also features directors that also took part in V/H.S.  Give it a shot.  Read my full review for this film here: Southbound

The Haunting In Connecticut (2009)

– This is a mostly-positive supernatural horror flick that delivers some decent jolts, especially in the second half.  It is also one of the few “inspired by true events” films that is more than 10% true.  It is based on the book In a Dark Place: The Story of a True Haunting, which is co-written by the famed Warrens featured in The Conjuring films.  Read my full review for this film here: The Haunting In Connecticut

The Last Exorcism (2010)

– I actually really liked this film until its ridiculous climax.  I hate to knock on a film for one thing, but this climax was egregious and I still hate the filmmakers for it.  Anyway, the storyline is great and centers on a former minister that agrees to let a film crew film his last exorcism.  Hoping to prove that demon possession is a mental illness, he learns his theory on exorcisms is dead wrong.  Read my full review for this film here: The Last Exorcism

The Monster (2016)

The Monster

– This is the newest film from The Strangers director Bryan Bertino.  It centers on an estranged mother and daughter who must confront a creature when their car dies on a lonely road.  Equal parts creature feature and psychological drama, The Monster is an interesting experience that does well in blending both elements.  However, the drama aspect is it’s weaker point.  Read my full review for this film here: The Monster

The Toxic Avenger II (1989)

 

– With Tromaville safe and sound, Toxie heads to Japan to search for his father.  Of course, this being a Troma film means insanity will ensue in Japan.  It’s a step down from its classic predecessor but still a fun watch for Avenger fans.  Read my full review for this film here: The Toxic Avenger II

The Thaw (2009)

– Give it up for the only environmentally themed horror flick on this list.  With the polar ice caps melting, a Val Kilmer-lead research team uncovering a whooly mammoth comes face to face with a deadly prehistoric parasite.  Read my full review for this film here: The Thaw

Trouble Every Day (2001)

Trouble Every Day

– I really wanted to like this film more.  It is quite acclaimed in the horror community, but I just never understood why.  What interested me in this film is it stars the incredible Beatrice Dall (La femme in Inside), as well as its cannibal theme.  Unfortunately, it didn’t deliver the horror I wanted.  Maybe it will for you, though.  Read my full review for this film here: Trouble Every Day

Wake Wood (2011)

– A film genre peeps will say should be rated higher. In this effort a young girl’s grieving parents take on a pagan ritual that will allow them to spend three days with their deceased daughter. Giving her back will prove more horrific than they ever expected. Read my full review for this film here: Wake Wood

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